Shredded dwarf galaxies may lack dark matter to hold them together

Many dwarf galaxies torn up by the gravity of nearby objects may not have any dark matter, which doesn’t line up with our understanding of the universe – but they may be explained by a controversial alternate model of gravity

Space 10 August 2022

W0MN5G This undated NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the galaxy IC 335 in front of a backdrop of distant galaxies. IC 335 is part of a galaxy group containing three other galaxies, and located in the Fornax Galaxy Cluster 60 million light-years away, December 30, 2014. As seen in this image, the disc of IC 335 appears edge-on from the vantage point of Earth. UPI/NASA

A galaxy located in the Fornax Cluster about 60 million light years away

UPI/Alamy

A nearby galaxy cluster called the Fornax Cluster is ripping apart its dwarf galaxies. They appear to be tearing up far more easily than we would expect, suggesting that they may not contain any dark matter. That may mean there is something fundamentally wrong with our understanding of the universe.

In the standard model of cosmology, called lambda-CDM, most galaxies should contain a healthy dollop of dark matter. The gravity of this invisible substance helps hold a galaxy …

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